Programme

  • 0830h
  • Registration opens
  • 0920h
  • Chairman’s opening remarks
  • 0930h
  • Opening Address
  • 0950h
  • Keynote Presentation
  • 1010h
  • Market Analysis – Africa’s Digital Journeys
    The 54 nations that make up the vast continent of Africa are all at different stages of their digital journeys and requirements. Here we take a sample of some of the key markets, the development of DC infrastructure, projections for future advances and potential bottlenecks.
    Guy Zibi, Founder/Managing Director, Xalam Analytics
  • 1030h
  • Africa’s Digital Leaders Roundtable
    Leader’s from within some Africa’s key data center, cloud and communications infrastructure operators come together to discuss their perspectives on the market. The roundtable will shed some light on key trends in business strategy, investment, demand and perspectives on the future of the Africa’s digital ecosystems.
  • 1100h
  • Morning Networking Break
  • 1120h
  • Results from African Union and European Union Digital Economy Task Force
    Benoit Denis, Digital Economy Division – Projects Directorate, European Investment Bank
  • 1140h
  • Panel Discussion: Finance & Investment – Market Appetite and Models
    Our panel discuss some of the key trends for data center and communications infrastructure investment for Africa. Where are the key markets? What investment types are proving most attractive? How do market profiles differ across the continent?
    Benoit Denis, Digital Economy Division – Projects Directorate, European Investment Bank
    Emmanuel Léonard, Business Development Director, Helios Towers
  • 1210h
  • Keynote Presentation
  • 1230h
  • Panel Discussion: Powering the Digital Revolution – Power Security and Development for DC Infrastructure
    Reliable power provision is a cornerstone for data center operations. As investment pours and Africa’s home grown data center sector expands how is the grid keeping pace? How are utility and DC operators working together to ensure uptime? What role is there for renewables? Are off grid options viable? And what investment is in place to develop grid infrastructure for the continent?
  • 1300h
  • Case Study
  • 1320h
  • Lunch
  • 1420h
  • Panel Discussion: Building the Digital Factory – How can Africa’s Data Center Capabilities keep pace with the Continent’s Soaring Demand?
    Demand for data center services is on the increase across the continent and as supporting infrastructure developments investment and development is set to accelerate. How can data center design and construction ensure facilities are up to the demands of increasingly sophisticated workloads? Is the supply chain in place? Are modular deployments the answer? What new technologies can be deployed to meet demand?
    Ranjith Cherickel, Founder and CEO, icolo.io
  • 1450h
  • Keynote Presentation
  • 1510h
  • Panel Discussion: Africa’s Digital Highways – Advances in Subsea, Terrestrial and Wireless Connectivity
    Connectivity is key to the evolution of digital advancement. However, historically most traffic has been routed through international servers, with irregular connectivity distribution for the continent creating a digital divide. What connectivity initiatives are in place to bridge the digital divide and provide capacity for Africa’s economies?
    Osvaldo Coelho, Business Development, Africa Lead, Athonet
  • 1540h
  • Afternoon Networking Break
  • 1600h
  • Panel Discussion: Cloud Deployment and Adoption – Cloud Provider and Enterprise Customer Engagement Strategies
    Cloud deployment and migration have only recently seen traction in the market for the continent of Africa. Here we explore some of the requirements for enterprises to engage on a cloud strategy, the sectors most ready to migrate and cloud providers’ plans for service development.
    Adetayo Ganiyu-Obafemi, CIO, Nestle Central & West Africa
    Dr Olufemi Oyenuga, Chief Customer Architect, Oracle
  • 1630h
  • Workforce Development and Retention for Africa’s Digital Economies
    Skilled workforce pipeline, development and retention is an area of concern for DC, IT and infrastructure sectors the world over. However is accentuated in high-growth potential, emerging economies. An initial need import expat workforce to set up and establish operations is costly, as is the development of home grown training and education infrastructure – particularly with competition for skilled workforce high across the globe. What can be done to help foster and retain Africa’s workforce requirements to ensure the future development of the continent’s digital requirements?
  • 1700h
  • Developing Africa’s Digital Regulation Environment to Accelerate Continental Advancement
  • 1720h
  • Chair’s Closing Remarks
  • 1730h
  • Networking and Datacloud Africa Awards Reception